Final – Enjoy

What grabbed your attention first?

Twisted

Peek-a-boo

One

Sunny

Sunny

Tear

Snake

Grapes

Ouch

Rise-and-shine

Cocoon

 

Artist Statement

When viewing artwork, it is interesting for me to see if I would be able to interpret and or guess what the artist meant when producing their art.  I appreciate works, which can be easily deciphered, however my true interest comes when I see photographs or other forms of art that have a deeper meaning behind what is shown.  When something is hidden, off center, or hard to notice, it intrigues the viewer and makes them want to know more, or to be able to dive inside the artist’s thoughts.  I intend for my audience to want to explore and think further.  I want them to move away, come back, and receive a completely new perception of my photographs. My work shifts emphasis between the foreground and the background. With this technique, I intend to give an everyday item a twist, which allows my audience to see that item with a new perspective.

I don’t want the viewers of my photography to have any preconceived notions, I want them to view my photos with an open mind and create their own stories progressively. I encourage them to note the space occupied by the subject. As a photographer, I have been inspired by beauty, innovation, depth, variety, and creativity.  Let my photographs give you inspiration to look beyond the obvious, and create.

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On My Own

Artist Statement:

When viewing artwork, it is interesting for me to see if I would be able to decipher and or guess what the artist meant when producing their work.  I appreciate works, which are more obvious, however my true interest comes when I see photographs or other forms of art that have a deeper meaning behind what is show.  When something is hidden, off center, or hard to notice, it intrigues the viewer and makes them want to know more, to be able to dive inside the artist’s thoughts.  This is my photographs’ inspiration and mine.  I intend for my audience to want to explore and think further.  I want them to move away, come back, and receive a completely new perception of my work.

I don’t want the viewers of my photography to have any preconceived notions, I want them to view my photos with an open mind and create their own stories.  I have been inspired by beauty, innovation, depth, variety, and creativity.  Now let my photos give you inspiration to look beyond the obvious and create.

My Images:

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Assignment #4 My Emulation Photos

My Work:

Emulation 3

Emulation 4

Emulation 5

Emulation 1

Emulation 2

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Assignement #4 Part 1; Uta Barth bio and work

Uta Barth

  • Born: Germany in 1958
  • Currently resides in California and is a professor at the University of California at Riverside; the department of Art
  • Been part in over 70 art exhibitions and galleries

One of her most famous collections are Ground and Field and “consist of blurred images generated by focusing the camera on an unoccupied foreground” (Journal of Contemporary Art).  Pieces from that collection have a “distinctively painterly quality, and have been compared to the formal aspects and quality of light in Vermeer’s paintings” (Adriano Pedroa, Frieze Magazine). This is a description given by Adriano Pedroa from Frieze Magazine about the work of Uta Barth in her Ground series: “blurred details of architectural interiors. Take a plain, straightforward snapshot of an individual in a vaguely familiar interior setting ­ by a window, a curtain, or a lamp, against a bookshelf, a white or grayish wall. The focus is, quite appropriately, on the subject (your mother, your father, your lover), and due to the large aperture, everything but him/her is blurred ­ perhaps a strip of a door might make it within the focus range, though it is very unlikely. Now eliminate the subject, not letting your camera rush its auto-focus to the background. Hold it still and shoot: that’s what a photograph by Uta Barth looks like” (Adriano Pedroa, Frieze Magazine).  It is also perceived that Barth’s work is mainly concerned with an absence or the lack of a subject.  This is what makes her photographs so wonderful and attention grabbing; the viewer is searching for the subject which is what fist draws them in.

This is a direct quote from Barth speaking about her Ground series and how the spectator plays a role in the photography and how she envisioned her photos to be seen:

It seems to me that the work invites confusion on several levels, and that “meaning” is generated in the process of “sorting things out.” On the most obvious level, we all expect photographs to be pictures of something. We assume that the photographer observed a place, a person, an event in the world and wanted to record it, point at it. There is always something that motivated the taking of a photograph. The problem with my work is that these images are really not of anything in that sense, they register only that which is incidental and peripheral implied. Instead, there are some clues to indicate that what we are looking at is the surrounding information. (The images lack focus because the camera’s attention is somewhere else. Many of the compositions, while clearly deliberate and carefully arranged in relation to the picture’s edge, are awkward, off-balance and formally suggest a missing element.) Slowly it becomes clear that what we are presented with is a sort of empty container and it is at that point that people begin to “project” into this space. It begins to read as an empty screen” (Barth, Journal of Contemporary Art, Interview).

Barth also explains that most of her recent images in that collection, consist primary of shadow information.

Here is another quick explanation of Barth’s work “This technique challenges the viewer to try to determine the camera’s point of focus, many times creating the illusion of an extreme close-up. Uta Barth points out that blur, or objects being out of focus due to a shallow depth of field, is an optical condition that works the same way in the eye as it does with a camera. Because the eye is constantly shifting its focus, we rarely notice this phenomenon.
By creating photographs that mimic the blurred images in our periphery, Uta Barth hopes to create a familiar feeling, having the viewer fill the emptiness of the image while feeling an appreciation for the everyday objects that we no longer ‘see'” (Photographers and Photography).

Below are some of the photos I enjoy the most from her Ground and Field Collections:

 

Fied #19

Ground #30, 1994, (Sieshoke.com)

Ground #95.6

Field #9

Ground #41
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Blog Post 6: Brainstorming

For my final project I would like to make a collection of photographs with the main theme of having one object in focus with a blurry background.  I believe that this way I can create some beautiful photography while giving all of the special attention to one single object.  I will have to take new photographs for this, as other assignment photos will not work with my idea.  I plan to take photos of nature as well as other household/familiar objects.

After attempting to do that on my camera, I am noticing that it is harder than I thought to capture one object perfectly clear and sharp while seeing the background blurred.  I am noticing that when I change my settings everything becomes blurry which is something I need to work on and perfect for this project.

Below you will see some of the photographs I took while trying to figure out how to take a picture of a clear object while blurring the background.

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Quiz 2 Image

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Superhero Comment

dani3455 says:

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Wonderful Job! The photograph has perfect exposure and the idea is clear.

The photo is very well lighted, having been taking on a sunny day with some snow on the ground. In the background I see Chicago’s skyscrapers with the sculpture Cloud Gate, also known as “The Bean” located in the middle of the photograph. Cloud Gate is a large reflective sculpture in the form of a bean, which in this photo shows the reflection of part of Chicago’s skyline along with the sun brightly shining. There is a giant baby girl covering the right side of the photograph. The baby appears to be giant because it is well larger than the sculpture. Towards the lower left corner there is a female adult of average size, however looking significantly smaller than the gigantic baby. Additionally, the baby is wearing pink pants and a pink shirt along with a multicolored vest. She is holding a book, appearing to be upside down, and screaming or blowing which can be inferred by the shape of her lips and mouth. The adult appears as if she is being blown away by the Godzilla baby.

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